ERP and Global march 4 Elephants and Rhinos

ERP and Global march 4 Elephants and Rhinos

MARCH AGAINST EXTINCTION

On September 24th, 2016, people throughout the world will take to the streets and march as one voice. We will join over 130 cities worldwide in defense of elephants, rhinos, lions and other wildlife. This will be a pivotal day for the future of wildlife. For on this day the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP17) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) convenes in Johannesburg, South Africa. 181 member of CITES will vote on issues to have lasting impact on wildlife. We want them to know the entire world is marching to demand their protection!

Unless action is taken now, we will lose these majestic, highly intelligent, and emotionally sentient creatures FOREVER.

More than 35,000 elephants are being killed every year so their tusks can be carved into ivory trinkets. A rhino is slaughtered once every 8 hours for its horn. Their only hope for survival lies in an immediate end to the ivory and rhino horn trade (both "legal" and "illegal") and the chance to recover from decades of mass slaughter.

Join us to represent ERP, groupelephant.com and EPI-USE in your city at this global event.

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Orphan rehabilitation and release research project update

Orphan rehabilitation and release research project update

Orphans are not always babies. Once a baby rhino (or any other species with parental care) loses its mother, it will be an orphan for the rest of its life. In the best case scenario, the orphan rhino will be found and rescued, and subsequently taken to a place where experienced staff can take care of him until he recovers from his wounds (physical and psychological) and can be released back into the wild. If not found, it will most probably die of starvation (if younger than 18 months and therefore not yet weaned) or taken by predators.

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Fieldwork has started for the orphan rehabilitation and release research project.

Fieldwork has started for the orphan rehabilitation and release research project.

In this study, scientists will combine behavioural data with physiological and physical data to assess the welfare of the rhinos going under rehabilitation, and the adaptation of these once they have been released. Because the welfare of the animals is paramount, all data collection is non-invasive; this means that data are collected without the animals being aware of it to avoid interference with their behaviour or causing them any disturbance or stress.

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Research on orphan rhino rehabilitation

Research on orphan rhino rehabilitation

Poaching of rhinos for their horns has resulted in the loss of many animals, which poses a grave conservation concern. A sad consequence of poaching is that sometimes more than one life is lost, especially when a pregnant mother is killed. Equally sad is when mothers with calves at foot are poached as these calves are then orphaned. 

The Faculty of Veterinary Science of the University of Pretoria, in collaboration with SANParks, Care for Wild, Kaapse Valley Conservancy and Mpumalanga Parks have initiated a research project in order to determine how rearing conditions and environment during rehabilitation affects subsequent adaptation of orphan rhinos once they are released into the wild. 

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Feel good story from Bikes4ERP Blouberg area South Africa 29 Apr 2016

Feel good story from Bikes4ERP Blouberg area South Africa 29 Apr 2016

Can you remember the day you received your first bicycle? 

This is good news story of South Africa and bicycles... where dreams of a better education exist but the odds against you is enormous.

 

Imagine Living in a community where you have to get up every morning and walk to school for more than an hour. After a tiring day you have to walk another hour home in the heat of the afternoon sun. When arriving home you have to walk another half an hour to fetch water because you do not have running water where you live. After doing some homework you have to start collecting fire wood to cook food. This is just the tip of the iceberg.

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The Stolen 18 -- Swaziland Elephants secretly shipped to the U.S. to avoid court scrutiny

The Stolen 18 -- Swaziland Elephants secretly shipped to the U.S. to avoid court scrutiny

Today, the fight to prevent a lifetime of captivity for 18 elephants, 15 of whom are currently under 12 years of age, came to an abrupt and devious end. As was widely reported over the past couple months, three U.S. zoos—the Dallas Zoo, the Sedwick County Zoo in Wichita, Kansas, and Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo—applied for and obtained from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) a permit to import these elephants from the wilds of Swaziland. 

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