Orphan rehabilitation and release research project update

Orphan rehabilitation and release research project update

Orphans are not always babies. Once a baby rhino (or any other species with parental care) loses its mother, it will be an orphan for the rest of its life. In the best case scenario, the orphan rhino will be found and rescued, and subsequently taken to a place where experienced staff can take care of him until he recovers from his wounds (physical and psychological) and can be released back into the wild. If not found, it will most probably die of starvation (if younger than 18 months and therefore not yet weaned) or taken by predators.

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Fieldwork has started for the orphan rehabilitation and release research project.

Fieldwork has started for the orphan rehabilitation and release research project.

In this study, scientists will combine behavioural data with physiological and physical data to assess the welfare of the rhinos going under rehabilitation, and the adaptation of these once they have been released. Because the welfare of the animals is paramount, all data collection is non-invasive; this means that data are collected without the animals being aware of it to avoid interference with their behaviour or causing them any disturbance or stress.

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Research on orphan rhino rehabilitation

Research on orphan rhino rehabilitation

Poaching of rhinos for their horns has resulted in the loss of many animals, which poses a grave conservation concern. A sad consequence of poaching is that sometimes more than one life is lost, especially when a pregnant mother is killed. Equally sad is when mothers with calves at foot are poached as these calves are then orphaned. 

The Faculty of Veterinary Science of the University of Pretoria, in collaboration with SANParks, Care for Wild, Kaapse Valley Conservancy and Mpumalanga Parks have initiated a research project in order to determine how rearing conditions and environment during rehabilitation affects subsequent adaptation of orphan rhinos once they are released into the wild. 

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Feel good story from Bikes4ERP Blouberg area South Africa 29 Apr 2016

Feel good story from Bikes4ERP Blouberg area South Africa 29 Apr 2016

Can you remember the day you received your first bicycle? 

This is good news story of South Africa and bicycles... where dreams of a better education exist but the odds against you is enormous.

 

Imagine Living in a community where you have to get up every morning and walk to school for more than an hour. After a tiring day you have to walk another hour home in the heat of the afternoon sun. When arriving home you have to walk another half an hour to fetch water because you do not have running water where you live. After doing some homework you have to start collecting fire wood to cook food. This is just the tip of the iceberg.

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The Stolen 18 -- Swaziland Elephants secretly shipped to the U.S. to avoid court scrutiny

The Stolen 18 -- Swaziland Elephants secretly shipped to the U.S. to avoid court scrutiny

Today, the fight to prevent a lifetime of captivity for 18 elephants, 15 of whom are currently under 12 years of age, came to an abrupt and devious end. As was widely reported over the past couple months, three U.S. zoos—the Dallas Zoo, the Sedwick County Zoo in Wichita, Kansas, and Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo—applied for and obtained from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) a permit to import these elephants from the wilds of Swaziland. 

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groupelephant.com Announces $25,000 Donation by SuccessFactors to Elephants, Rhinos & People Initiative

groupelephant.com Announces $25,000 Donation by SuccessFactors to Elephants, Rhinos & People Initiative

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA--(Marketwired - February 29, 2016) - groupelephant.com announced today that SuccessFactors has donated $25,000 to groupelephant.com's Elephants, Rhinos & People (ERP) program, pursuant to its $1 per Tweet campaign that ran throughout the 2015 SuccessConnect conference season. The interactive fundraising program was launched by Mike Ettling, president of SuccessFactors, at the inaugural 2015 SuccessConnect event held in Las Vegas in August, and ran through December. 

ERP Redux: Elephants, Rhinos & People

Read the full story...

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The Tembe KZN/Mozambique cross-border elephant project

The Tembe KZN/Mozambique cross-border elephant project

Historically, Elephants migrated freely between Southern Mozambique and the former Northern Maputaland (now referred to as the northern part of uMkhanyakude District), South Africa, until 1983. During that year, the local chief on the South African side (iNkosi Tembe) anticipated that elephant migration from Mozambique could become a security problem for his people and in an effort to pre-empt a crisis, decided to proclaim the Tembe Elephant Park, an area measuring approximately 30,000 hectares under his jurisdiction on the South African side of the border. Fencing began in in 1984.

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